The Canadian House of Commons

The House of Commons is one of the compositions of the Parliament, along with the Senate and the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General). The House of Commons is a group of people elected, who are known as the Members of Parliament (MPs). There are 308 MPs in the House of Commons. Members have a maximum of five years to serve in the House of Commons. The MPs are elected by the country’s federal electoral districts. These districts are generally referred to as ridings.

The House of Commons was created in 1867, when the British North America Act of 1867 created the Dominion of Canada. Even though the House of Commons is referred to as the “Lower House,” it has greater power than the “Upper House” (Senate). For a bill to be passed, both houses must agree, but it is extremely rare that a bill proposed by the House of Commons is rejected by the Senate. Occasionally, the Senate proposes bills and the House of Commons review its validity and how it will affect Canadians. The Prime Minister of Canada can stay in power as long as he/she receives support from the Lower House.  The Canadian House of Commons is in the Centre Block of the Parliament Buildings on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa, Ontario. 

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